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, britain's crucial wall it need civil war." good to have you on this program. let me start by asking you what there is to value or appreciate about the british role? why should we care about the british rule, what they thought about the civil war? >> it is very hard to even believe that, once upon a time, britain was the most powerful country on the planet. in the 1860's, it mattered. which side britain chose would determine the course of the war. at the beginning, britain went neutral credit that allowed the role of the south to do get out. they spend the rest of the war .rying to change britain's mind more than that, the southern coast was located by federal ships. the only way it would get its arms and medicines and volunteers from of is if they wanted over. they equated those block gators and give themselves a lifeline for almost two years -- they either aided -- they eveaded those blockaders and gave themselves a wi-fi from most years. was hours away neutral on a war that was over the instrument of black people. when they did get involved, they took the side of the south. how my sup
in prison for his opinions. someone else who also led to jail was britain's greatest investigative journalist if you have read king leopold's goes to will remember him as the man who exposed the brutalities of the king leopold congo and his term was extremely harsh and he died not long after words really as a result. a very brave man. war opponents like this were up against the unceasing verizon of propaganda. here is the u.s. army recruiting poster from the period, a typical of things you saw on both sides. a german poster, with god 14 and fatherland. a poster warning against for heaven's sake say potential german invasion of australia. some of the probe for propaganda has an edge to it. you would be letting down the when and if you did not fight. or perhaps you were all blimp evading your responsibility and worse yet if you refuse to fight maybe you were a feminist. there was a nasty edge to the patriotic fervor in the air. as i mentioned, there were more resistors in all the countries we were fighting, but for various reasons the sharpest conflict between those who thought the w
culture in britain. there is no evidence the "new york post" published stories similar to those published in "news of the world" or "the sun." it does at the least raise questions about the journalism here. >> in other news, security forces in syria have shot at least 20 protesters across the country. throughout the day, thousands of people staged some of the biggest protests so far against the rule of president asisad. roughly 1400 civilians have died since the uprising began in march. in egypt, thousands rallied in the two largest cities. five months after president mubarak was removed from power, they are becoming impatient with the interim military rulers. they are demanding that police officers accused of killing protesters during the uprising be put on trial. in libya, the fighting continues. the main opposition group was given a diplomatic boost today. the united states and other nations have recognized it as the governing authority in the country. the announcement came from istanbul where secretary of state hillary clinton is meeting with other members of the group. for more on th
war when britain's survival was in the balance. out in the atlantic, the convoy brought essential supplies, the food without which the population would stop, the munitions without which the war werwould collapse. there were sunk by german ships. nazi germany was in danger of winning. britain desperately needed a break through to survive. it happen here in secluded countryside 40 miles north of london. this is quiet and rather overlooked now, but, 70 years ago, these prefabricated huts were part of one of britain's most secret and model assumptions. it was here that britain broke the codes of the german military. the most brilliant mathematician, crosscourt experts, and linguists were brought together to tackle the intercepted messages of this, the supposedly impenetrable german cipher machine called enigma. the british built this, called colossus. this is a replica of it. it is generally considered to be the world's first computer. with its coats, which had taken codebreakers six days to crack by hand, it could now be crack in a matter of hours. >> we would have lost a war. it is
in today. these are officer cadets at britain's most exclusive private school drilling in 1915. now, one of the things about the wars that we have gotten accustomed to in this country in recent years, vietnam, iraq, and the stand is that they are fox mostly by the poor. they are are very very few among the dead and wounded in those three wars who have been sons or daughters off ceos, senators, members of congress, anything like that. it was the exact opposite and the first world war. the death toll actually fell proportionately higher on the upper classes. and the main reason for that was that it was customary for sons of the upper classes, sons of the aristocracy, to have military careers. and i think a major reason for this is that armies are not only there to fight wars against other countries. they are there to maintain order at home. the 19th century was a very tumultuous time in europe, so was the early 20th century. many of the european armies were used to break strikes or the british army you know, put down tenant farmer rebellions in ireland, and so therefore officer in the army
and forth between britain and japan, but the case appeared to go nowhere. searching for the prime suspect and eventually getting to see him in the dark. bill hawker wanted the courts to give his daughter's killer the heaviest punishment possible. theoretically, that could be the death penalty, though prosecutors have called for life in jail instead. their daughter's killer has also written a book in which he details the crime and has promised the proceeds to lindsay's family. her parents have said they won't touch the money and want nothing from him. >> a new study suggests that taller people are at greater risk of developing a range of cancers. the research in the lancet found that, in women, the likelihood rose by 16% for every four-inch increase in height. they said taller men were also at increased risk. our health correspondent, james hughes, has the details. >> we're all at risk of developing cancer, and rising rates mean four in 10 of us will get the disease at some point in our lives. but it now seems taller people are the most vulnerable. ed study looks at cancer risks over a sin
an appeal at against extradition from britain to sweden. he is accused of sexual offenses. his lawyers told the high court in london that the description of the charges were misleading and unfair. he denies any wrongdoing. still to come on the program, more on the u.k. phone-hacking scandal, what it means for media relationships around the world. >> breyer earth elements are crucial, but to controls the lion's share of production? police and guatemalans have arrested two men in the collection of argentine singer. he was one of the most respected folk singers. his car was ambushed. >> he gave voice to millions of the disenfranchised latin america is back on home soil. after his violent killing in guatemala city last week, the argentine folk singer was returned or he will be mourned the most. they also have questions about how a musician once named the u.n. peace envoy could have been brutally murdered. >> we know there is an investigation about the person who drove the car. if anything more further from the ideals of time, it will be violence or anything related to the drug cartels. >> the a
, "bbc world news." >> they are all agreed. britain's political party's united against news corporation as the hacking fallout grows, and could there be an american investigation. an american politician wants to know about the hacking scandal, if it's extended to 9/11 victims. >> and pro vin shall brother escapes from an explosion on his way to a funeral. >> and coming up on the program, plenty more dead fish in the sea. what europe is doing about its wasteful side to have fishing industry. and the latest winner of the euro lottery. how would you spend it? >> hello, the combined political weight of all three main hearts in britain will come down on the media organization news corporation today. a parliamentary debate rupert murdoch's takeover bid will be asked to be dismissed. it's due to unacceptable practices to gain information for stories including phone hacking. >> united against rupert murdoch. the conservatives and demonstrates have made a highly unusual decision to support this calling on him to withdraw his bid. >> it's in the public interest that rupert murdoch sees there's co
time after timed. i've witnessed it firsthand in great britain, places like sweden where people would never believe there are no go zones for police in these enclaves in europe and even a place like dearborn in america is developing into that but the hub, the center of activity in each of these cases is, yes, the mosque. >> host: all right. you mentioned that they're going up all over the country. one of the ones that you talk about is the islamic center of murfreesboro, tennessee. we've been fixated on the ground zero mosque in manhattan. large facilities like northern environmental. but this is on 52,000 square feet in a tiny suburb of nashville, all right? why? what -- what is the strategy there because you spend a lot of time talking about this in the book. and this -- you know, aide guy from the defense department when i was going to a briefing on this tell me, this is very much in keeping what mao used to call the war of position. you move through the countryside. you leave deposits of your belief and ideology and infrastructure and by the time you get to where you want to go, y
him. we'll bring you more information when we have it. >>> britain's former prime minister gordon brown is the latest victim of phone hacking. the sun and sunday times improperly obtained personal information like bank and medical records on his family. two senior police officers will be grilled by a committee of mps why they didn't investigate phone hacking claims earlier. >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has criticized syria for failing to protect embassies after pro-government demonstrators broke windows and spray painted walls. no one managed to get into the building. >>> divers are still searching for victims of a deadly boat disaster. the boat was overloaded, not licensed to carry passengers when it sank on sunday. president dmitry medvedev ordered an investigation. >>> u.s. president barack obama is meeting with lawmakers for another round of debt talks on tuesday. the debate stalled over how to slash the deficit and raise the debt ceiling before the u.s. defaults. republicans want spending cuts but democrats support tax hikes and neither side wants to compromise
, "bbc world news." >> britain's new phone headache hacking news spreads. it prompts a rare debate in british parliament. >> and concerns portugal may need another bailout after its debt rating is reduced to junk status. >> and will it beya has produced a western arc to protect the city of misratah. welcome to "bbc world news." i'm david eades. also coming up, the news of family in. how could this latest tragedy have been prevented? >> and the focus of the berlin fashion week. >> the phone hacking scandal right at the heart of the media group news international continues to deepen as the british parliament prepares to hold an emergency debate on the issue. police now told the relatives some of the victims of the 1995 bombing that some of the victims' cell phones may have been hacked by the news of the world. >> tomorrow is the sixth anniversary of the london bombing. today some of the enter reaved are enduring fresh anguish, what is described as details discovered as part of the latest investigation into phone hacking. >> these parents lost their son david in the bombing. he is not
. they cracked the german code. >> there were some of the darkest days of the second world war, but britain's survival was in the balance. out in the a plan to, and -- in the atlantic on shipping convoys were bringing the supplies and munitions, but they were being sought by german submarines. it off heather's nottie germany threatening to win. this is blechly park. seven years ago, these were some of britain's most vital establishments. it was here that they broke the code of the german military. the most brilliant mathematician, crossword lynn was and others were brought together. -- crossword linguists and others were brought together. the british built this to help break the code. it was called colossus. it is generally considered to be the world's first computer. with its coats, which had taken the codebreakers six days to crack by hand, it could not happen in a matter of hours. >> we would have lost the war without it. is that important. >> 70 years after the code breakers worked in total secrecy, their work, which is -- which is said shortened the war by perhaps two years, received t
, "bbc world news." >> the security transition in afghanistan -- after america, britain confirmed plans to step back from combat duties. visiting afghanistan, of princeton -- british prime minister cameron says he was confident the country will be able to look after its own security by 2014. >> as we see a stronger and more confident afghan national army, stronger police -- many of whom we trained ourselves -- and also local police, i do think it is right to start planning the withdrawal of some of our troops. welcome to "gmt." also on this program -- newspaper executives are expected to meet british police today over allocation the phones of a murdered teenage girl was attacked -- allegations. back and in fighting spirit. the venezuelan president makes a surprise return from cuba following treatment for cancer. it is midday here in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, d.c., and mid afternoon in afghanistan where nato has confirmed the death of another four of its soldiers. they were killed in the east of the country where foreign troops, mostly american, are battling a fierce taliban insur
and killing -- 30 countries including the u.s., france, and britain has recognized -- have recognized the rebels. with gaddafi still firmly entrenched despite months of bombing, the anti-government forces have stepped up their offenses in western libya. >> heavy fighting continues in western libya. the rebels have waged a five- month campaign aimed at capturing tripoli. gaddafi forces have proved a formidable opponent. the government has received support from the global community. the international contact group has given its full support to libya's transitional council, recommended the formation of an interim government. they have also asked that gaddafi relinquished power. -- gaddafi relinquish power. >> there are no other options. >> it is an important diplomatic milestone for the libyan opposition, especially now that the u.s. has officially recognized the rebel movement. >> we still have to work through various legal issues. we expect this recognition will enable the tnc to access additional sources of funding. >> there has been much to service demands for political and financial
for joining us. now to the hacking scandal which continues in britain. but those even further. after gordon brown claimed in an interview that the "sunday times" also part of the murdoch empire hire criminals to obtain the information. there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon that downing street with rupert's starter next to him and the top editor on the right. for years, team brown stayed close to t murdoch. no more. peace miles fell away. gordon brown accused them and their newspaper of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> some were getting information from my lawyers. like a tax attorney said that medical records have been broken into. i do not tell how all of this happened. in two instances, there is absolute proof that news international, was involved in hiring people to get this information. ith people that the work wa our criminals. >> this is the editor of "the sunday times." in a statement tonight, they believe ethanol law was broken, no criminal was used edie story was published giving both sides of the hearing. he attacked the way it reported that his you
will compete, but >>> euro fighter has been ordered by its four partner nations, britain, germy, britain and spain. but india is seen as critical to keep production going. we caught up with enzo cazellini at the air show. >> congratulations with india where you were chosen for the fighter competition. i want to start by asking you, how do you expect to win. how do you expect to beat euro. >> let me start by saying that we're going to -- we have cooperation with india and france. we know india, we know the country and we believe that india can make boosts from the political level and continue this full type of click collaboration with spain. >> reporter: and do you feel you have a stronger industrial cooperation package as well. >> we have also very strong cooperation. we believe that all together we can offer much more attractive situation for the future development of india industry. >> reporter: of the whole order of aircraft about 130 aircraft or so, 18 of them are supposed to be built in europe in existing factories but the rest coproduced with hanestan in india. but hanesta had some
on. >> default, get it over with. >> we came up celebrating great britain. but next, a new book at how britain played a crucial role in the american civil war. stay with us. we'll have that with more "morning joe." ♪♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ look at that car, well, it goes fast ♪ ♪ givin' my dad a heart attack ♪ [ friend ] that is so awesome. ♪ i love my car [ engine revving ] [ male announcer ] that first chevy, yea, it gets under your skin. ♪ >>> 40 past the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us, award-winning historian and internationally best-selling author, amanda foreman. she's out now with a new book, "a world on fire." britain's crucial role in the american civil war. i love the back story. what a woman. today's woman. it took her ten years to write this book? >> ten years. she had five kids along the way. >> that's busy. >> that's impressive. >> to say the least. >> got in the book a tad bit. >> tell us about the book that has an amazing cast of characters. >> 197 characters, mostly men. system of the women are so great that they stand out. my favorite is th
-cutting bill aimed at averting default today, while in britain thousands of public sector workers went on strike rallying against pension reforms. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at whether austerity measures can work to spur economic growth and help solve the european debt crisis. >> brown: then, we have a newsmaker interview with white house chief of staff bill daley about the stalled debt talks, a day after the president scolded congress. >> warner: betty ann bowser reports on a colorado hospital where medical mistakes are rare. >> one in three americans are at risk of a hospital acquired infection or will become a victim of a medical error. this hospital in denver is doing something about that. >> brown: ray suarez explores the prospect of another tech bubble. this time from social media websites. >> warner: and we get a rare view of dissent in china, following a new surge of protests by young people and labor union members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour
murdoch's newspapers in great britain now face their own accusations of appallinging wrong doing. their report target no less than the royal family and a former prime minister. in fact, gordon brown says the paper had links to criminals in order to hack into his bank accounts. and the medical records of his seriously ill son. meanwhile, members of parliament are demanding tough answers from police. how do they not uncover a hacking conspiracy that could mushroom to thousands of victims? let's get the latest from rivers live in london. they are asking murdoch and his son to testify? >> reporter: yeah. i mean, this is a pretty incredible development, inevitable, perhaps given the huge fury about the whole scandal. ruppert and rebecca brooks have been asked to appear before what is a select committee here which is a cross-party committee of members of parliament and can question people about a particular issue. the police involved in the current inquiry and in past inquiries have been questioned by a similar committee this morning. it's a pretty ferocious grilling that they get here
-term agreement. >> ifill: now, britain's prime minister takes on his critics in the phone hacking scandal. david cameron faced questions today about hiring a former tabloid editor who's since resigned and been arrested and about rupert murdoch's aborted bid for b-sky-b-- british sky broadcasting. we start with a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: rupert murdoch flew the prime minister postponed parliament's summer break by a day to try to re-establish his own standing with a statement and debate. after two weeks of resisting pressure for a full-scale apology for hiring andy coulson david cameron edged towards one and he said people would hear the full genuine article if andy coulson was found to have lied. >> i have an old fashioned view about innocent until proven guilty. but if it turns out i've been lied to that would be a moment for a profound apology. and in that event i can tell you i will not fall short. people will of course make judgements about it. of course i regret and i am extremely sorry about the furore it has caused with 20/20 hindsight and all
senior aide to britain's prime minister david cameron has been arrested in a growing scandal involving phone hacking and corruption. >>> finally, let me finish with the space shuttle launch today and the wondrous pioneering president jack kennedy once championed. >>> we start with the jobs numbers. david corn, msnbc political analyst. michael steele is the former chairman of the republican national committee. now an msnbc political analyst. welcome. did you hear the glee, the giggles of delight on your side of the aisle? come on. michele bachmann said she hopes the bad numbers help her. >> no, no. >> she said that. >> i know what she said. let's just get serious for a moment. you had 18,000 jobs created last month. the 54,000 for may was the revised down to 25,000. the reality of it is americans are still hurting and both the administration and members of congress and the republican leadership, in particular, we can't paint specifically on job creation, need to get serious about this. all the talk about the debt and all the dancing belies -- >> you think the debt is an important issue?
a 10 minute break, and then the meeting resumed. >> it is being referred to as britain's watergate. executives, the police, and the u.k. political eat. we spoke earlier to birgit. david cameron. >> it is definitely david cameron as political judgment that is question a lot at the moment because he had hired andy coulson, who was involved in the hiking scandal. he is still a high spokesperson and a personal friend and still is a personal friend, and along with drugs and other top executives, has been arrested -- and along with brooks and other top executives. he is so close to people in the murdoch empire. some say they should not support david cameron any longer. definitely, it is not looking good. >> that was our reporter talking to us from london. >> shares in news corp. have rebounded by more than 5% tuesday, but the media conglomerate has suffered badly under the scandal. share prices plunged in reaction to the phone hacking scandal and took about 6 billion euros off of the value of news corp. since july 5. despite speculation about whether murdoch will be able to stay on as ce
empire is at an all-time low in britain as new allegations emerge daily of data theft and hacking at other news court papers. >> thanks. the united states has condemned syria for refusing to protect the american and french embassies in damascus from attack by government loyalists. the u.s. state department said mobs assault of both the u.s. embassy compound and the ambassadors residents, but that no staff were injured. progress government demonstrators filled central damascus over the weekend, expressing their anger at the presence of the u.s. and french ambassadors in the city that has been the center of opposition to president al assad. member protests on the streets of syria, this time by supporters of the al assad regime. they took part in a rally against the ambassadors of the u.s. and france. they -- the show support for the democracy movement prompted an angry show from damascus. franz's foreign ministry said the crowds were well organized, while security forces did nothing to stand in the way -- france was a foreign ministry. the u.s. also condemned the day's events. >> it
, there are questions about the cozy relationship between the police come and media, and politicians in britain. >> i am the first prime minister publish meetings between senior executives, private tears -- proprietors. this stretches right back to the general election. >> it was his decision to fire the former "news of the world," editor andy coulson that is drawing the most criticism. there are questions about whether andy coulson knew about the illegal activity on his watch. >> he was caught in a tragic conflict of loyalty between the standards and integrity that people should expect of him and his staff and his personal allegiance to andy coulson. he made the wrong choice. >> you don't make decisions in hindsight, you make them in the present. you live and you learn and to believe you me, i have learned. >> the labor leader pointed out that downing street had been warned over andy coulson's past. the opposition also alleges that cameron has met 26 times with representatives from murdoch's companies since taking office. >> let's get the continuing impact of this whole scandal on rupert murdoch's empi
economy is stable at this time because the government has taken difficult decisions to get to britain's defeat. to -- to britain's debt. and they announced they have no plans to abandoned that plan. >> to norway, and the justice minister praising the fantastic work done by police after the bombing and shooting on utoeya island. but there has been criticism to have time it took police to get to the island. it's emerged that police also overestimated the number of people who died on the island and revised the death toll from 86 to 68. eight people were also killed in the bomb attack and a number of people are still missing from the island. >> the most important thing is we are completely focused on supporting the families of those and all those affected. we have things in mace all over the country and have people in our government affected. we have missing people at utoeya. and we have many people deeply affected. we have to look after them. i'm completely open to discuss how the response to these attacks have been handled. but i would like to emphasize that the police have done a magni
is very powerful as well and back there and britain, politicians are simply too scared to confront the murdoch empire? >> a british company could not go and buy anything more than 20%, he has 30% of british sky. it is been argued that he has far too much power and they assume that his papers decide whether they will become the prime minister or the next government. that is totally unacceptable. >> it was your former boss who was one of the first to cozy up to rupert murdoch. >> if you ask him, and you can ask gordon brown. they used to be played up funny enough by rebecca brooks. they have far too much influence and they have produced this kind of scandal and it must top. >> are you confident that this will stop now that the public is so outraged by who else has been hacked? >> the public is rightfully outraged by this. there is a failure by the commission. the police have been cozying up. you can be assured that parliament would like a piece of this and across the party lines. we have to do something about the media moguls like mr. murdoch who are saying that everything will be ad
this morning, rebekah brooks, rupert murdoch's most senior newspaper executive in great britain has stepped down and resigned from her position. we'll see what happens next there. >>> meanwhile back in washington, president obama says it's decision time, telling congressional leaders yesterday he wants to see a deal on raising the debt ceiling in the next 24 to 36 hours. if not, he says lawmakers will have to return to the negotiating table this weekend. the president expected to hold a news conference on the negotiations at the white house in just a few hours. the president's deadline comes as the front page of the "wall street journal" reads "plan bemerges on debts," reporting harry reid is embracing mitch mcconnell's, quote, backup plan that would allow the president to raise the debt ceiling in three installments through the 2012 election. aides say the senate leaders hope to link a pack of spending cuts to mcconnell's plan, although it's unlikely it would include any tax increases. house republicans remain split on mcconnell's proposal, even though speaker john boehner is refusing to d
and that it is the achievements of the two countries. >> we can be proud of what this statue says about britain and america. it reminds us of a period of extraordinary achievement and hope in world affairs after a time of darkness and danger. it celebrates the life of an exceptional and gifted american president. it's a fitting tribute to one of the truest friends that britain has ever had. >> reporter: former british prime minister margaret thatcher, a close friend of reagan's, was invited to the event but was too frail to attend. the statue was commissioned by the reagan memorial fund trust and joins here in griefnor park of former presidents roosevelt and eisenhower. >>> back here at home, thousands are celebrating independence day with the nation's first president. and holly morris is caught up with general year washington earlier at his mount vernon, state. >> if you can talk to one person, who would it be? many people say the first president. general george washington and as luck would have it on this july 4th, i knew where i could find him. greetings, general washington. >> madame, welcome to mount
robinson reports. >> end to britain's most powerful, most feared media going you will. the policemen are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take that -- them into questioning. that fell into a crew of m.p.'s. his wife was behind him. offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously at his side throughout. >> i would like to say how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> rupert murdoch was determined to deliver one key line. >> i would just like to say one sentence -- this is the most humbling day of my life. thank you. >> they were sorry, they were humble but whose fault was the criminality in their company? >> do you accept that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who is responsible? >> the people they trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> who that was he wasn't say. >> this is not an excuse. maybe it's an explanation. news world is less than 1 -- news corp is less than 1% of our company. i employ 53,000 people around the world. >> at this point his wife patrolleded him to stop banging t
to britain at age 10. his father was a broadcaster and politician. his early work was thrillism. he had a one-man show at age 21. but these are not just bodies. he said he wanted to paint people, their hopes, memories, how they happened to be. >> in our computer age, in a way he reinforces what is special and unique about painting. >> he was never flattering, never one to hide a blemish or able to. he painted bodies as he saw them. not even the queen was scared. models often had to endure unbearably long sittings, and they were more often than not friends, lovers, and members of his own family. >> i do not want to use them for an idea i have. i actually want to do them and even their identical twin would not do at all if i did not know them. >> he had a large family. these are just two of his daughters, but is thought that he fathered dozens of children throughout his life. his legacy? he was britain's cozy preeminent painter of the nude. in an age of abstract art, he brought the power of paint and the human form laid bare. >> you have been watching news day from the bbc. >> that is it from u
. the international response has been mixed. britain has given 23 million pounds to somalia this year. the u.s. barely half of that. germany and france are among those accused of ignoring the alarm bells. >> the job has been dangerously inadequate. britain is setting a good lead. we expect others to contribute. there are signs that people are putting their shoulders into it. we need that to happen rapidly. >> money is not the only problem. the famine has taken hold in areas controlled or influenced by a militant islamist group. they have made it too dangerous for foreign aid groups to operate. now, they said that the ban has been lifted but the politics are complicated and help is not getting to the right people fast enough. the familiar images of hunger and helplessness and the predictable scramble for money and access as the famine bites into somalia. >> at least one person is reported to have been killed in malawi during protests against the government of the president. demonstrations have been held in cities across the country despite an earlier court ruling banning the protests. police sealed off
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 283 (some duplicates have been removed)